How Hollywood and news media shaped Alabama’s remarkable extraterrestial history

The movie posters of It Came From Outer Space (1953), Forbidden Planet (1956) and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) (From left to right © Universal Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Walter Wanger Productions)
Figure 1: Two officers and Ann Hodges pose for a news photographer under the hole through which the meteorite crashed. (© Alabama Museum of Natural History)
Figure 2: Ann’s husband Eugene cradles the meteorite like a newborn baby (© Alabama Museum of Natural History)
‘The Comet’ drive-in theatre at 1176 Odens Mill Road, Sylacauga, photographed in 1949. (Photographer unknown)
Sci-fi films like It Came From Outer Space (1953), Forbidden Planet (1956) and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) represented America’s societal fears (From left to right © Universal Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Walter Wanger Productions)
The town of Fyffe was the location of multiple UFO sightings. Between February 11–12, 1989, more than fifty people called the Fyffe Police Department to report sightings. (© Brian Stansberry)
Weekly World News is one of the many papers that retroactively reported on Ann Hodges’ life as a tragedy (© Weekly World News, 31 December, 1991)
Josua Hutagalung posing with the meteorite (© Josua Hutagalung)

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Jelle Havermans

Jelle Havermans

Jelle Havermans (1994) is a visual artist and writer. He writes about horror, true crime and the history of photography and film.